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What is the role of epidermis in plants class9?

What is the role of epidermis in plants class9?

Answer: The epidermis is formed of single contimous layered cells. It covers without any intercellular space and protects all parts of the plant. Epidermal cells on the aerial parts of the plant secrete a waxy, water-resistant layer on their outer surface.

What are the functions of epidermal cells?

Epidermal cells include several types of cells that make up the epidermis of plants. Although they serve a number of important functions, their primary role is to protect from a variety of harmful factors (environmental stressors) including microbes, chemical compounds as well as ultraviolet light among others.

Why is epidermis important for the plants short answer?

The epidermis is important for it gives protection against water loss. Epidermal cells present on the aerial parts of the plant often secretes a waxy, water-resistant layer on their outer surface. This provides protection against loss of water, mechanical injury, and invasion by parasitic fungi.

Why is epidermis important for the plants write any two reasons?

Epidermis is a very important for plants because; 1) It helps in absorption of water and controls gaseous exchange. 2) It protects inner organs of a plant from outer environment.

What is the role of epidermis in plants Ncert solutions?

Answer: The epidermis is formed of single contimous layered cells. It covers without any intercellular space and protects all parts of the plant. Small pores, called stomata, are present on the leaf, and help in the exchange of gases and water.

What is role of epidermis in desert plants and in roots?

Cells of epidermis form a continuous layer without intercellular spaces. It protects all the parts of the plant. It performs the function of absorption in the roots. It may have a waxy covering called cutin which prevents loss of water in desert plants.

How is epidermis useful to plants mention one important function of stomata?

Stomata are composed of a pair of specialized epidermal cells referred to as guard cells (Figure 3). Stomata regulate gas exchange between the plant and environment and control of water loss by changing the size of the stomatal pore.